Comparing US and Foreign Edition Covers!

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I don’t know about you, but I love looking at foreign edition covers of my favorite books! So, I decided to put together a little comparison post of US edition covers vs. foreign edition covers to look at the differences!

This list is going to be made up of some of my all time favorite books. So here we go!


1. Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake

Russian Edition vs. US Edition

I love both of these covers. They are both pretty much the same image-Anna standing outside of her house in a blood-tinged white dress-but in very different styles. I think they both do a wonderful job conveying the tone and feel of this book.

Winner: Tie
Foreign Editions: 1
US Editions: 1

2. Letters to the Lost by Brigid Kemmerer

Croatian Edition vs. US Edition

I love that both of the covers have the flowers covered in words! I think that is so cute, and if you read the book, it really does have a deeper meaning. The US edition cover is very pretty, but I have to say that the Croatian Edition just blew me away when I saw it. I think it is absolutely stunning, and I wish I could get Letters to the Lost in that edition, just so I could look at the cover.

Winner: Foreign Edition
Foreign Editions: 2
US Editions: 1

3. Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

Finnish Edition vs. US Edition

I adore the US edition cover of The Red Queen. It is simplistic and powerful and stunning. I love the Finnish edition too, but it just doesn’t bring the same feeling of danger and high-stakes that the US edition conveys.

Winner: US Edition
Foreign Editions: 2
US Editions: 2

4. The Forbidden Wish by Jessica Khoury

Polish Edition vs. US Edition

Both of these editions are gorgeous. I love the lamps in both of them, and the smoke. Although I like that Zahra’s face is in the US edition, I feel like the Polish edition brings more elements of the story to the cover, and conveys all of the magic and the gorgeous setting much better.

Winner: Foreign Edition
Foreign Editions: 3
US Editions: 2

5. Stalking Jack The Ripper by Kerri Maniscalco

Latvian Edition vs. US Edition

Both of these covers ARE SO PRETTY. The Latvian one is definitely more to-the-point (with that dark figure in the background and all), but the US one is much more mysterious and intriguing.

Winner: US Edition
Foreign Editions: 3
US Editions: 3

6. Ruby Red by Kerstin Gier

German Edition vs. US Edition

This book was actually written and first published in German, so that edition is the original one. Buttttt…… I’m really not a fan of the German covers. They don’t do it for me. The US covers, however, are gorgeous.

Winner: US Edition
Foreign Editions: 3
US Editions: 4

7. How to Hang a Witch by Adriana Mather

Italian Edition vs. US Edition

If I’m being completely honest, I’m not really a fan of either of these covers. The US edition cover doesn’t really convey the feel of the book, and the Italian edition cover makes the book look a lot spookier than it actually is. That being said, I do love that the Italian cover added the raven, and I feel like it is a better match for the story.

Winner Foreign Edition
Foreign Editions: 4
US Editions: 4

8. Unraveling by Elizabeth Norris

Spanish Edition vs. US Edition

These covers are so different, yet they both fit the story so well. The US edition has all the little numbers counting down in the back, which provides a sense of urgency… and makes the cover look a little more sci-fi. It also has multiple Janelles and Bens, which kind of hints at the big reveal (which I will not spoil for you). The Spanish cover, on the other hand, hints at the same thing with the shattered effect, which I honestly like a little more.

Winner: Foreign Edition
Foreign Editions: 5
US Editions: 4


So it seems the Foreign Editions have won this round. What covers would you like to see foreign editions of? Did you agree with my favorites in this post?

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Guest Post- 3 Things You Need To Know Before Crowdfunding

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Hi everyone! Today I have a special guest author, Grace K. Francis, who has written a guest post about her experience Crowdpublishing her novel. Grace is a German writer and her debut novel, Codename: DEREC was published in April 2016 with the help of publishing company Kladde. Read about her experience and the pro’s and cons of Crowdfunding!


The term crowdfunding has been around for what seems like forever, hasn’t it? Platforms like Kickstarter have given it a huge boost in the last few years. When I first heard about it, I thought it was a great idea for young entrepreneurs to find financial support for their business. I had no idea that the same thing existed for books, which is also known as crowdpublishing.

After finishing the last edit of my manuscript at the beginning of 2015, I had already long forgotten about crowdfunding. The thing I worried about at that point in time was whether I should contact a traditional publisher or dare to go down the path of self-publishing. Self-publishing seemed pretty intimidating to me so I discarded that idea pretty quickly; although I admittedly didn’t do much research on it. Instead, I went on the search for a German publisher, and like every young author aiming to make their debut, I was terribly insecure.

During fall, 2015, I found Kladde, a small publishing house in Freiburg, Germany. That was when the term crowdpublishing entered my life again. Kladde publishes their authors’ books via crowdfunding only, because that’s how they collect the money they need in order to pay their proofreaders, editors, cover designers and so on.

By referencing my own “publishing journey”, let me tell you the most important things you need to know when considering crowdpublishing your work.

1. You still have to decide whether to publish traditionally or self-publish

The number of publishers like Kladde, who only publish via crowdfunding, is significantly low; even more so in the English-speaking publishing world than in the German one. You could, of course, start a crowdfunding campaign for yourself to raise the money you need for your project. But keep in mind that with self-publishing you have to do everything yourself from editing to marketing and everything in between. If you go with a traditional publisher when you crowdfund, they will set up the campaign for you, advertise your novel, and you’ll be able to profit from their experience.

2. There is the risk of not getting fully funded

The thing about crowdpublishing is you take a big step at a very early stage of your publishing journey, and at that early stage you have to be convincing.

The website of my campaign contained a short video of me introducing myself and my novel, an extract of the novel, a synopsis, and a list of “perks” that those who donate receive in return (example: someone who donated 10€ received a copy of the E-Book and a handwritten Thank You card).

This early step can be a blessing and a curse: your audience (aka your possible readers) are the ones who decide whether your book gets published or not. They decide whether it’s interesting enough for them to read. Once they decide “Yes, I want this novel in my shelf,” they will most likely donate, which is of course a great thing because it’s a way for readers to actively be involved in shaping their personal, literary preferences. However, if you’re not convincing enough, they’ll just close the tab of their browser and move on (which would be bad).

It will make you doubt yourself and your work

Trust me, I’ve been through self-doubt with my debut novel.

My campaign started off really well; probably because the first people who donated were family and friends who I had told about my project. I reached the first 15% of the funding threshold within the first two days and I got incredibly excited!

My crowdfunding was set up so that I had a total of 55 days to collect 3000€. After my initial friends and family head start, I received several donations from people I didn’t know (but who most likely read about the campaign on my publisher’s Facebook page). I didn’t start to feel the self-doubt until about 5 days prior to the end of my campaign, when the donation number stopped going up.

You have to know, I can be very pessimistic at times. That was such a point. It made me feel like my book wasn’t good enough to be published. I began to doubt my writing skills, my style, my entire novel because I knew that if I didn’t reach my campaign goal, my novel wouldn’t get published. I was dependent on these readers, and if they left me hanging so close to the goal, I surely must have been not convincing enough, right?

Wrong.

I ended up reaching my goal just a few hours before the deadline ended. I even reached more than what I would have needed.

It was then that I realized that crowdpublishing is indeed a risk, but it’s a risk worth taking, because at least you’ll have people supporting you who are genuinely interested in your book. Of course you’re dependent on them, but hey, at some point in life, everyone is dependent on someone, right?

I’m glad that I took the step of crowdpublishing for “Codename: DEREC” because although it’s nowhere near perfect (the sequel will be so much better), I learned a lot from the experience itself. I learned how to represent my novel and myself as an author on the internet and on social media. I also learned how to deal with self-doubt and even with 2 star reviews, after it was published. And knowing those things can help a great deal once you’re really getting into the “industry”.

And remember, if there are any new opportunities opening themselves up to you, take them. As long as you’ve got “your book’s back,” you can do anything!


GKF

Grace K. Francis is a bilingual author born 1997 in Germany.

She began writing at the age of 10 and published her first book “Codename: DEREC” on April 20th, 2016.

While working on its sequel, she’s now started to work on her first English-speaking project, a homoerotic novel set in Japan.

Grace K. Francis has a partiality for everything Japanese, music, tattoos and cats.

Grace is currently searching for Beta Readers for her newest novel! If you are interested, message Grace on her Twitter (click here).