Author Q&A- Kev Heritage

Today I had the pleasure of interviewing the amazing Kev Heritage. With several books under his belt, and a new one releasing soon, he is definitely an author to watch! Read the Q&A below!

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Q: How long have you been writing? Why did you start?

A: I was introverted as a child. Reading books and disappearing inside of them made me want to write stories. So that’s what I started doing at about age 14.

Q: What inspires your writing? Do you have a muse?

A: No muse, per se. Inspiration comes from everyone and everywhere—to be honest, I sometimes feel bombarded by ideas. The discipline for me is to try and write them all down. I do, mostly. I record all ideas in my smartphone and transfer them to story folders (both physical and virtual) and then never look at them again…

Q: Tell me about your latest release, Vatic. What was the original idea behind it?

A: I’m a ‘pantster’ – I write by the seat of my pants, not to any pre-conceived set of notions. I learnt a long time ago that it’s a waste of time for me to plan ahead as I have no control over events and characters. They refuse to go the way I want them to, and besides, it’s more of a thrill ride to let myself be swept along as the story unfolds, although I can sometimes dig myself into such a 27302333big hole that it’s impossible to get out! It’s a difficult, annoying and sometimes unhappy process but I’ve learned to trust my instincts.

With Vatic, I fancied writing something in first-person-limited, just to see if it was easier than third-person. So I thought I’d knock out a quick short mystery for a compilation that I’ve been working on for a while now called The Lady in the Glass. I had no idea about who Vatic was or who he may be, but I knew I wanted to write a mystery—and that it would start with someone thrown out into space with no oxygen. And off I went!

I literally had no idea who any of the people were until the moment they arrived. And yet, who they were influenced how the story developed. I find by far the most interesting part of the process is in the conversations. It’s through them that everything unfolds (and, as often as not, becomes more complicated).

Vatic’s affinities and dislikes are all organic, so that when we get to the denouement, we don’t feel cheated. Or at least, Vatic didn’t. All the clues were there from the start. Even if I didn’t know what they were at the time!

Q: Your writing falls under the popular genres of sci-fi and fantasy. What challenges have you had breaking into the market? What makes your books unique?

A: Sci-fi, fantasy and mystery fans love my stories, but I have fans who just like a well-crafted story, regardless of the genre.

The challenge of any author is ‘getting into the market’. I see writing like creating an album of music. You put in equal work, time and effort into writing each song, and hope that amongst them there will be a hit – and everyone will go out and buy the rest of your output.

Unlike songs, books, take a lot longer to write. And I tend to write what I fancy writing, rather than to anything prescribed by the market. But having said that, the more I’ve written, the more I’ve discovered my niche. I’m a mystery writer at heart—and that is reflected in the way I write, which is finding out what the hell is going on! So that’s what I do. I write sci-fi and fantasy adventure mysteries, with the emphasis on fast-pace, great characters and to never, ever cheat the reader.

Q: You have published many books, including the Into the Rip series and the IronScythe Sagas. Which was the most fun to write? Which was the hardest?

 They are all equally as hard and as fun as each other. I go through the same process of excitement, elation, depression, confusion, relief and desperation and always think that the finished product isn’t any good… And then a big side-order of surprise, when the reviews come in and the readers like it. Phew!

The most mentally challenging work was Blue Into The Rip. It was my first release, and at that time I didn’t have any editors, so it was a risk to edit the novel myself and put it out there. A big risk. Luckily, I have a strong work ethic and I’ve been an editor for most of my working life, so I got away with it! If anything, I’d say it’s slightly over-edited.

 Q: How much ‘grunt work’ goes into each of your books? Is there a lot of research involved?

A: I do no or little research. I have an expansive knowledge of science, astronomy, astrophysics etc. which I also use. For anything I’m not sure about, a quick Internet search does the trick.

The rest is pure grunt work. The first draft is always hell. I hate it. I don’t write with any plan, so at about 70K words in, I have an idea what the novel should really be about and then I have to rewrite from the bottom up. As they are usually mysteries, this makes this approach onerous. The process usually involves weeks of no writing and outright panic until I have my eureka moment and find the thread that I need to continue—although, sometimes, I have to abandon. A low moment after months of work. But it is what it is.

And then it’s redraft after redraft. About twenty of them before it goes off to my editors (it’s greedy, I know, but I have four!). After that there’s a few more edits before my final, final, last edits.

Q: If you were implanted into one of your books for a day, which would you want it to be and why?

A: Blue into the Rip – simply because it’s a modern take on a boy’s own adventure, with time-travel, rocket ships, genetic engineering, a globally-warmed future, space-walking and a cracking mystery thrown in for good measure. My main character, Blue, doesn’t have it easy, but it’d have to be my choice simply for all the cra-mazing things he gets up to.

Q: Which of your characters do you relate the most to?

A: Pretentiousness Alert!

I’m afraid, it’s all of them—in some way or another. They’re all mostly little bits of me with other people thrown in for good measure. So the question is really ‘which bit of myself do I like the most?’ Heh. Hmm. Difficult. But I’m going to go for the combination of Vareena and the Cowl from The IronScythe Sagas. Vareena arrived as a bit character and became so a lot more. She is very much her own woman—irrepressible, strong, full of verve and enthusiasm but also unpredictability. I’m presently writing Part Four and it’s all about her dark destiny. The Cowl on the other hand is a disfigured outcast, a loner forced to live his life under a hood, and to forever carry IronScythe—a blade of forbidden metals and golds—for without cursed iron, he is nothing. Together, they make an unlikely pairing, but it works. The pair represent the Ying/Yang of my own personality, perhaps, also seemingly made up of these kinds of polemics.

 Q: Where is the strangest place you have ever come up with an idea?

 A: As I have said, I’m always having ideas. So if you can imagine any human activity, I’ve pretty much come up with an idea at the same time…

Q: What is something you want the world to know?

A: My secret identity, which I have to keep hidden from the world. But one day…

You can find Kev Heritage online:

Amazon Author Page: US | UK

Website: http://kevheritage.com

Twitter: @KevHeritage

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/KevHeritageAuthor

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/KevHeritage

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/KevHeritage/

To keep in touch with Kev and his news & releases, subscribe here.

 

 

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Author Q&A- T P Keane

Today I had the pleasure of interviewing one of the most interesting authors out there; T P Keane! She is getting ready to publish The Paladins of Naretia, her debut novel!

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Q: How long have you been writing? Why did you start?

A; I suppose I’ve been writing all my life. As a child, I was never a really good student. In fact, I wouldn’t be amiss at saying that I was probably one of the worst. That was somewhat of a confidence stomper. But I loved stories, and I would often imagine my new worlds and adventures while I lay in bed at night. It wasn’t until I had my two children, and started telling them the adventures I dreamed, that I began to write them down.

 

Q: What inspires your writing? Do you have a muse?

A: I have many muses. Every time I pick up a work of art by a great author, and see how he/she has twisted words and descriptions to not only describe the world I’ve been plunged into, but also the atmosphere. It’s something I’m trying very hard to emulate, but I’m not sure I’ve gotten it down yet. Most recently, I’ve been reading The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, by NK Jemisin. I have to say, that is as close to perfection as I ever hope to become.

 

Q: You are the middle child of seven children! What was it like growing up with that many siblings? How close are you in age?

A: Growing up with six other brothers and sisters and be described in two words, loud and constant. Thankfully I was subject to the “middle-child syndrome” where often I would be forgotten, or paid very little attention to. But that only applied to my parents, who were too busy running around after a multitude of diaper-wearing monsters that were only content when they were dismantling the house from the ground up. It was tough going for my parents, and I often wondered how my mother did it all. Most of us, with the exception of the eldest, were only a year to two years apart.

 

Q: You fell back in love with storytelling when you began telling your two children bedtime stories. Did these stories spawn the birth of your upcoming book, The Paladins of Naretia?

A: The stories I told my kids were more quirky, odd-ball tales of green elephants with ten wings and a perpetual need to fart. While those kinds of stories weren’t the seeds for The Paladins of Naretia, they were the stirrings that began my need, my want, to create a world properly. I wanted to explore my talent, or lack thereof, in story-telling, regardless of my inability to spell (thank God for spellcheck). It has also just occurred to me that if this all flops on its face, I can blame them.

 

Q: Tell me about The Paladins of Naretia. What went on behind the scenes of creating such an amazing book?

A: I could tell you the plot and the characters behind it, but that can be read on the cover of the book. Behind the scenes, however, is a completely different story. While Olórin, an aged wizard, is set the task of saving the29354761 kingdom by also saving his adopted son from his real father, the dark god Dantet, this isn’t the crux of the story. The Paladins of Naretia is about love. It examines, on three fronts, the bravery and destructiveness that love can bring. Firstly, we have the broken love between Dantet and Edwina, the two ruling gods. They are the divorced parents, if you will, caught up in the hatred of each other and using their children, the people of Naretia, as pawns. Secondly, we have the false love between Olórin and his adopted son, Aramus, who he hopes against all odds will have inherited some humanity from his mother’s side. But Aramus, like Dantet, is incapable of truly loving anything. In the end, Olórin must face the truth of what this means. Our third, but not last, portrayal of love, is true love. Through the novel, we begin to hope, to pray, that Aramus falls in love with the tyrannical queen, Aria, who must put aside her demons to help them. Olórin hopes that love between them would help Aramus stay away from the darkness. But there is only one true love in The Paladins of Naretia, and that is between Aria and her seven-year-old brother Pearan. Her love for him is unconditional and fearless. In the end she will make the ultimate sacrifice to save his life.

 

Q: If you could go back to when you first began writing, what would you tell yourself?

A: Read more, examine how other authors convey their meaning and believe in yourself.

 

Q: If you could be any one of your characters for a day, who would it be and why?

A: Superficially, I would like to be Aramus, because I would love the ability to fly. But truthfully, I thing I would like to be Sudia, an elf who is half-turned and fighting for her life and for a cure. She intrigues me. Although she is not a main character in the book, she will play a bigger role in the subsequent books and I can’t wait to see how she, a grey-elf, will end up being the moral compass.

 

Q: What is your absolute favorite book? Why?

A: I have so many. I love John Green’s Fault in our Stars, because it is such a heart-warming and breaking story. I also love Ransom Riggs because of the way he uses old photos to spin a tale in Ms Peregrines Home for Peculiar Children. Although I have many authors I love to read, I’m slowly becoming an uber-fan of NK Jeminsin, purely because of his skill… and maybe because it’s an awesome story.

 

Q: You have lived in several places. What has been your favorite so far? What makes that place special?

A: I’ve lived and worked in Ireland, UK and in USA. It’s been a wonderful experience to get the opportunity to not just visit each of them, but become part of them. There are certain aspects of each that I both loved and disliked, but for the most part, they bring their own unique cultural and social differences… which is fodder for my books, of course.

 

While I was born in Ireland, and it has many of my family and friends, I’ve never been a fan of the weather. Too much rain and grey skies for me. The States has yielded many more friends and I’ve loved the snowy winters and hot summers of New England. But the UK has always held a special place in my heart. I can’t really explain why, but something inside of me keeps drawing me back to the UK and we may very well end up settling there again.

 

Q: What is one thing you want the world to know?

A: That if I can do it, so can they. Anyone who knew me as a child, would have never thought that I would publish a book. I would never have thought it either, but my love of story-telling is like breathing to me. It’s something I have to do. So, if I can get around my inability to spell, my lack of experience, the little voice in my head telling me to “not be so stupid and don’t embarrass yourself,” then so can anyone. Self-belief is crucial to following your dreams no matter what they are.

 

You can find T P Keane online:

Website: www.tpkeane.com

Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009366060306

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TPKeaneauthor

Amazon book link: http://www.amazon.com/Paladins-Naretia-Book-one-ebook/dp/B01AYC44ZU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1455206850&sr=8-1&keywords=the+paladins+of+naretia

Facebook book release party: https://www.facebook.com/events/988671311200675/