Discussion: How do we feel about movie tie-in covers? The pros and cons.

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I’ve seen some mixed feelings about movie tie-in covers. Some people love ’em, some people hate ’em, and some people just don’t care.

I’ve decided to list a few pros and cons of movie/TV tie-in covers. Also, I’d love to hear your thoughts too, so don’t forget to comment!!

The Pros:

1. They can look super awesome.

Like sometimes even better than the original cover *collective gasp*. But seriously. Take Nerve for example. The movie tie-in cover is so much better. Have you seen the original cover? I was actually so surprised by it because it looked so bad (I’m not trying to offend anyone here, I’m just sharing my honest opinion). I never would have picked it up if not for the movie tie-in cover (or if I hadn’t seen the movie before hand tbh).

Here is a side by side comparison so you can see what I’m talking about:

I mean really, which cover would you be more likely to pick up?

2. They can get people to read a book who might not usually want to read a book.

Sometimes when I drag my not-bookish friends into the book store, they see a movie tie-in cover. Then the conversation goes something like this:

Friend: Hey! I didn’t know they were writing a book about that movie?!

Me: Ummm, you know the movie is based off the book, right?

Friend: Uh, yeah, yeah, what you said. But that movie was awesome! Do you think I should read the book version?

Me: mmmm

Me: yessssssssssss

Friend: You’re right! I should totally read more! I think I’m gonna get it.

3. Sometimes you find out there is an adaptation coming because you spot the tie-in cover.22851100

This tends to happen when you pay more attention to new books coming out rather than new movies and shows.

Take The Giver for example. I probably never would have heard about the movie version (when I did) if I didn’t see the movie-tie in cover.

4. They can feature some of your favorite actors and actresses!33940357

For example: I love Nick Robinson. He is on the movie tie-in cover of Everything, Everything. Guess which edition I bought.

You guessed it! The movie tie-in version.

Although I really didn’t like the book… or the movie… so maybe that’s not the best example?

5. Sometimes they have some pictures from the movie in the middle.

I’m not really sure if this counts as a pro or a con… I guess it depends on how terrible the movie is and how much the actors actually look like the characters.

But still, I always have fun flipping through the pictures, regardless of whether I have/will read the book or watch the movie.

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The Cons:

1. They can look super terrible.

My first pro was that they can look awesome, so naturally my first con is that they can be a complete train wreck.

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For example: when they shove ever single actor in the movie onto the cover. Especially in that weird fade/layover style. Seriously?! Who designs these things?! Who thinks that that is appealing?!

Or when the tie-in cover is so far off from the feel of the book.

Great example of both of these things? The Great Gatsby tie-in cover.

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Now don’t get me wrong, I love me some Leo DiCaprio, but can you honestly tell me that this cover looks appealing? It’s certainly a cool movie poster, but it doesn’t quite cut it as a book cover for me.

2. They can feature an actor that looks NOTHING like what the character is supposed to look like.

Sometimes there are just minor differences, like the characters hair length is wrong (see: Everything, Everything’s Ollie) or they aren’t the right height.

But sometimes the differences are much worse than this. Like the (almost) entire cast of The Hunger Games. Or Cara Delevingne’s role as Margo in Paper Towns (disclaimer: I’ve seen the movie but I haven’t read the book. That being said, I still know about this and it annoys me).

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Not: Short or curvy 

 

3. They can remind you of a painfully terrible movie/show that never should have existed in the first place.

LIKE THE SHADOWHUNTERS TV SHOW UGHGHGHGHGHGH

31342081Okay so I didn’t like the books, but I liked the movie (yeah, yeah, yell at me all you want. But that’s how I feel). So I figured that maybe the TV show would be more my speed too.

I WAS SOOOOO WRONG. I made it through mayyyybe one episode (I think I finished the episode?). But it was too painful and now every time I see the tie-in cover it makes my blood boil and stops me from trying to pick up the Mortal Instruments series again.

4. They can cause a book store to not carry THE REGULAR COVER THAT YOU NEED SO YOU DON’T STARE AT ACTORS YOU DON’T CARE ABOUT/LIKE WHILE READING THE BOOK

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I think the title of this one says it all.

5. The book is better than the movie. Why would you want to walk around looking at the movie cover rather than the book one?

The book is better than the movie with very few exceptions. So why would you want to be staring at not-the-actual-book-cover?

Also it annoys me so much when the movie is literally nothing like the book AT ALL and would literally never be associated with the book if not for the name of the movie and then there is still a tie-in cover.

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One good example: The Duff by Kody Keplinger.  I loved both the book and the movie (obviously the book was better though) but they were so different that I don’t really think there should be a tie-in cover.

So do we like tie-in covers?

I personally can go either way. Sometimes I love them and sometimes I hate them. There really isn’t an in between.

How do you feel about them? What are your pros and cons? Let me know in the comments!!

Thanks for reading!

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Book Reivew- The Great Gatsby

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The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Published by Scribner on April 10 1925
Genres: Classics, literature
Pages:
180
Goodreads
Amazon

THE GREAT GATSBY, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.

The Great Gatsby was a wild ride. It was full of lies and deception from every character, yet there was something about the story that was sincere and beautiful. Fitzgerald manipulates the English language like no other, and I found myself peeling back layer after layer of meaning.

The characters were so lifelike it felt as if they were not characters at all, but real people that lived spectacular lives. But somehow at the same time they too outrageous to believe. There is too much dimension to comprehend with one sitting.

The Great Gatsby is definitely not the kind of book you can curl up with on a rainy afternoon and read. It is the kind of book that you read chapter by chapter, pausing after each one and trying to wrap your brain around what just happened. It’s the kind of book you want to read with a friend or group of people, just because there is no way one person can uncover the hidden messages in the pages by themselves.

I think everyone should read The Great Gatsby at some point in their lives, just because it is something that makes you ponder the true nature of society. I am going to give The Great Gatsby four out of five hearts.

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥