Book Review- The Red Queen

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The Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard
Published by Orion on February 12, 2015
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult, Dystopia, Science Fiction
Pages: 383
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This is a world divided by blood-red or silver.

The poverty-stricken Reds are commoners, living in the shadow of the Silvers, elite warriors with god-like powers.

To Mare Barrow, a 17-year-old Red girl from the Stilts, it looks like nothing will ever change.

Then Mare finds herself working at the Silver palace, in the midst of those she hates the most. She quickly discovers that, despite her red blood, she possesses a deadly power of her own. One that threatens to destroy Silver control.

After having this book recommended *ahem, shoved in my face* multiple times by multiple people, I decided I should probably just read it- so at least I could tell people to back off if I didn’t like it. But, I was actually really surprised by this one.

I’ve been trying to move away from the dystopia book, mostly because after a while they just all sound the same. Maybe that’s why I enjoyed this so much- because I haven’t read a dystopia in quite some time.

Anyway, I’d be lying if I said that this book doesn’t remind me of others. It reminded me A LOT of The Selection series (which I also enjoyed, so I didn’t mind that at all), and had some similarities to a bunch of other dystopias, like the Hunger Games (the whole area/fighting aspect), and pretty much any dystopia where the main character finds out they have powers.

I loved the characters in this book, and the depth they had to them. Yes, some of the *ahem* not as important characters were a little one sided *ahem* Evangeline *ahem*. But for the most part, the characters were interesting and some had some very surprising sides to them.

The one thing that really sets the Red Queen apart from other dystopias was the theme repeated throughout the book: Anyone can betray anyone. It was so relevant throughout the story, and I felt like it really tied the events of the book together.
BUT THE END. OH THE END!!!!!! I wont spoil anything, but that just threw me for a loop. UGH. WHYYYYYYYY.

Anyway, I would definitely recommend this book to people who love YA, The Selection, and/or dystopia (or are looking to get into/back into dystopia). But just be sure to have the second book on hand, because if you are anything like me then you’ll have about two seconds to breathe before your nose is buried in the Glass Sword!

I am going to give Red Queen four out of five hearts.

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Book Review- The Time Thief

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The Time Thief by Linda Buckley-Archer
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on December 26, 2007
Genres: Time Travel, Fantasy, Young Adult, Historical Fiction, Adventure
Pages: 488
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An accident with an antigravity machine catapulted Peter Schock and Kate Dyer back to 1763. A bungled rescue attempt leaves Peter stranded in the eighteenth century while a terrifying villain, the Tar Man, takes his place and explodes onto twenty-first-century London. Concerned about the potentially catastrophic effects of time travel, the NASA scientists responsible for the situation question whether it is right to rescue Peter. Kate decides to take matters into her own hands, but things don’t go as planned. Soon the physical effects of time travel begin to have a disturbing effect on her. Meanwhile, in our century, the Tar Man wreaks havoc in a city whose police force is powerless to stop him. Set against a backdrop of contemporary London and revolutionary France, The Time Thief is the sequel to the acclaimed The Time Travelers.

The Time Thief was a thrilling sequel to The Time Travelers (you can read that review here). The story begins where the first book ended, which I won’t say too much about because that would give away what happens in the first book.

There was a lot of great character development in The Time Thief, and I got to learn more about a lot of the characters who did not play such big roles in the first book. I loved the amount of perspectives that the story was told from, and how the events happening in different times and places were effortlessly put together into the story.

To my surprise, I ended up enjoying The Time Thief much more than its prequel. The story was more engaging, the plot more exciting, and the characters had more depth to them. I do wish that Gideon the Cutpurse was more present in the book, but at the same time, the reasons for his absence were good.

The end of this book has me grabbing at my shelves for the final book in the trilogy, The Time Quake. I would recommend this series to anyone who likes stories about time travel (this trilogy definitely has an interesting take on it), adventure, and historical fiction.

I am going to give The Time Thief four out of five hearts.

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Book Review- Gideon the Cutpurse

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Gideon the Cutpurse (also published as The Time Travelers) by Linda Buckley-Archer
Published by Simon & Schuster on January 1 2006
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult, Time Travel, Historical Fiction
Pages: 404
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1763.

Gideon Seymour, cutpurse and gentleman, hides from the villainous Tar Man. Suddenly the sky peels away like fabric and from the gaping hole fall two curious-looking children. Peter Schock and Kate Dyer have fallen straight from the twenty-first century, thanks to an experiment with an antigravity machine. Before Gideon and the children have a chance to gather their wits, the Tar Man takes off with the machine — and Kate and Peter’s only chance of getting home. Soon Gideon, Kate, and Peter are swept into a journey through eighteenth-century London and form a bond that, they hope, will stand strong in the face of unfathomable treachery.

Gideon the Cutpurse was full of adventure. From the moment Peter and Kate were thrown back in time, there was not a second of rest. The narrative follows both the events of 1763, where Peter and Kate meet Gideon and set out to find a way to get home, and present day (or not so present because the book came out in 2006), where the police along with Kate’s father and NASA are trying to find the children.

Although the events had all the promise to be a five star read, the actual story fell a bit short. I felt bored at times, like there was a cycle between excitement and boredom throughout the book. Then there were parts that could have been so much better, but weren’t. I feel like there could have been so much more done with the characters that would have brought the story to life. The reactions I read didn’t feel realistic, it felt like a bedtime story.

I also found it a bit strange how there were pages at the end of some chapters from Gideon Seymour’s personal journal. They felt a bit out of place, and didn’t really add anything to the plot. I don’t know if they evolve into something more in the rest of the trilogy, but I can only hope that there is a greater reason for them being there.

There is so much I wish I could add to this book, but at the same time, I can’t say I didn’t like it at all. It was a fun read, even if I had to read it in little chunks at a time. I do however think that an elementary school kid would eat this book up, and I definitely recommend it for preteens and younger who love time travel and adventure. I just don’t think this book was quite for me.

I am going to give Gideon the Cutpurse three out of five hearts.

♥ ♥ ♥

Book Review- The Last Star

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The Last Star by Rick Yancey
Published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers on May 24 2016
Genres: Young Adult, Science Fiction, Dystopia
Pages: 338
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The enemy is Other. The enemy is us.

They’re down here, they’re up there, they’re nowhere. They want the Earth, they want us to have it. They came to wipe us out, they came to save us.

But beneath these riddles lies one truth: Cassie has been betrayed. So has Ringer. Zombie. Nugget. And all 7.5 billion people who used to live on our planet. Betrayed first by the Others, and now by ourselves.

In these last days, Earth’s remaining survivors will need to decide what’s more important: saving themselves…or saving what makes us human.

After two incredible first books, I feel like The Last Star fell a little short. The characters were still awesome, and I was rooting for them 100%, but by the third book the trilogy lost its steam.

A lot of the plot points in this book felt like they were taken from books 1 and 2, reimagined, and thrown back in. It just felt repetitive. When a big decision came up, the outcome was too predictable. The characters didn’t grow and change, they just did the same things over and over again. Not that their decisions didn’t make sense (because they did), but I just wish that there were some more original situations that the characters needed to adapt to rather than having the same dilemmas over and over again.

I also found the alien’s motives more than a little confusing. Looking back, I’m still not exactly sure why they came to earth and what they were trying to accomplish. It felt like the reasons didn’t fit with the plot, and it just seemed strange. Also the way the plot was revealed seemed very unrealistic.

I was hoping that at least the end of the book would have a big bang, but I was let down. The end was predictable, and felt like it was trying too hard. The book didn’t feel resolved. It felt like I was left in some strange limbo version of the book, and there should have been another hundred pages to tie up the plot.

I don’t regret reading The Last Star, especially because I enjoyed The Fifth Wave and The Infinite Sea so much. However, I do wish that it was more original. I am going to give The Last Star three out of five hearts.

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Book Review- The Infinite Sea

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The Infinite Sea by Rick Yancey
Published by Putnam Juvenile September 16 2014
Genres: Young Adult, Science Fiction, Dystopia
Pages: 320
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How do you rid the Earth of seven billion humans? Rid the humans of their humanity.

Surviving the first four waves was nearly impossible. Now Cassie Sullivan finds herself in a new world, a world in which the fundamental trust that binds us together is gone. As the 5th Wave rolls across the landscape, Cassie, Ben, and Ringer are forced to confront the Others’ ultimate goal: the extermination of the human race.

Cassie and her friends haven’t seen the depths to which the Others will sink, nor have the Others seen the heights to which humanity will rise, in the ultimate battle between life and death, hope and despair, love and hate.

The Infinite Sea was a rush. It was high action from start to finish, and I could not put it down for the life of me. There were unseeable twists and turns, as well as those moments where you wish you could yell at the charater and tell them something they don’t know, but of course it’s a book so they can’t hear you.
There are two “books” in The Infinite Sea. The first book follows Cassie, Evan, Zombie, and the recruits (minus Ringer becuase she goes off on a mission). The second book follows Ringer, which I didn’t think I’d like, but I ended up loving more than I can possibly tell you. And the ending of that section tore my heart out. I mean, just when you think there are no good people left, one comes and rips out your heartstrings.
Rick Yancey has a way of building intricate backstories into the book that is absolutly beautiful. It builds this connection between you and a character, like you have known them your whole life. They seem like real people rather than characters written in the pages of a book.
If you like sci-fi and/or dystopia, this series is definately a series you need to read. And like I said in my review of The 5th Wave, if you are someone that wants to try a dystopia series, this is a great one to start with.
I am going to give The Infinite Sea five out of five stars! I can’t wait to see what happens in The Last Star!

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Book Review- The 5th Wave

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The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Published by  G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers on May 7 2013
Genres: Young Adult, Science Fiction, Dytopia
Pages: 457
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After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother-or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

 

The 5th Wave was not your average end of the world story. Quite honestly I wasn’t sure how to feel going in. I had seen the movie (which I liked for the most part), but dystopian trilogies do get kind of *ahem* repetitive after a while. But boy oh boy was this a breath of fresh air.

First of all, I just want to thank Rick Yancey for not making romance a large subplot. THANK YOU. Was there romance? Yeah, sure there was some. But for once an author has been able to write an amazing book about teenagers trying to survive an apoctoliptic world without having all the groping and yearning and overall gaggyness (is that even a word?) that so many other books seem to have. Instead, there is the issue of trust, and the currency of promises.

Another thing that I love about this book is how relateable the characters are. They have their breakdowns and crises and somehow find a way to move past them. BUT IT ALL FEELS SO REAL. I couldn’t put the book down for fear something would happen while I was away. And honestly that is how all books should make you feel.

I would definately recommend this book to anyone who loves dystopian and/or sci-fi. And also to anyone who is looking for a good book to get them into the genres. I am going to give The 5th Wave five out of five hearts.

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